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Romeo & Julia

(2006)

Isolated by a natural disaster a group of people locked themselves into a basketball court hoping that the horror is mitigated. They kill time: telling stories: one of the stories thy share - in the manner of a modern Decameron - is Romeo & Juliet’s - everyone knows it. They are enthusiastic with the idea. They retell it, they re-enact it: they live it, they turn it biography.
(…)
The story casts in reality. The lovers’ suicide awakens the dark will to carry out this act in a massive way: the danger threatens from outside the basketball court: the solution seems to be voluntary death. The whole group - as the history of R&J unfolds - is dictating its suicide will. In this way R&J becomes the material reality of this bunch of people. The presentation space (the field) becomes the space of representation (Verona or Mantua) and vice versa. The fiction constructs reality or reality constructs fiction or even better: no border between them: only the will to name this or that in a reassuring way in order to save oneself from the boundaries of imprecise.
Alejandro Tantanian

DATASHEETS
  • Romeo & Julia (Romeo & Juliet)
    Version by Alejandro Tantanian from William Shakespeare’s Romeo & Juliet

  • with
    Julia
    Anna Eger

  • Romeo
    Philippe Graber

  • Lord Capulet and Lord Montague
    Christoph Künzler

  • Friar Laurence
    Henry Meyer

  • Tybalt
    Jürgen Sarkiss

  • Nurse
    Anja Schweitzer

  • Lady Capulet and Lady Montague
    Anna Stieblich

  • Mercutio
    Peter Waros

  • Paris
    Christoph Gerega
  • Romeo's friend
    Martina Potratz

  • Romeo's friend
    Roland Bonjour

  • Friar Markus
    Kai Wissner

  • and the children
    Kenneth Häcki, Matina Suppich, Pascal Schärli & Mara Schmeid.

  • Lights
    Gerard Cleven

  • Set
    Jorge Macchi & Oscar Carballo

  • Costumes
    Oria Puppo

  • Music and sound design
    Edgardo Rudnitzky

  • Dramaturgy
    Caroline Weber

  • Direction
    Alejandro Tantanian

  • Running time: 150 minutes with an interval.

  • Premiere: January 13th, 2006, Luzerner Theater, Luzern, Switzerland

     

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Photos: Luzerner Theater & Ernesto Donegana

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